Southern California Conference

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 11/06/96

Contact: David Sandoval, Cal State L.A. Phone: (323) 343-3200
-- or -- Clyde Flowers (323) 343-2941 (message)

PROMISES, PROBLEMS AND POSSIBILITIES OF THE INFORMATION AGE

Southern California Conference on Technology, Employment and Community
Reaches Out to a Diverse Spectrum of Southland Communities at Cal State L.A.

Los Angeles, California -- Monday, November 6, 1996 -- The School of Business and Economics at California State University, Los Angeles and The Impact of Technology on Society Project are planning The Southern California Conference on Technology, Employment and Community, to be held Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, November 21, 22, and 23.

PURPOSE: This unique gathering will bring together academics, community activists, students, business people, "cyber-techies" from L.A.'s burgeoning interactive community, and the unemployed, to discuss the "promise, problems, and possibilities of the information age." Based on the notion that nature of work in Los Angeles, the nation, and the world is undergoing a major transformation, The Southern California Conference on Technology, Employment and Community hopes to stimulate a lively debate among the many diverse communities in the Los Angeles area that have a profound stake in the content, theory, and practice of the information revolution.

Cyber technology promises a bright future, free from scarcity and back-breaking labor. At the same time, technological change has already destroyed jobs and created social upheaval. These rapid developments have given birth to a debate over how society should adapt to the Information Age. Often, the people most affected by these developments are left out of the debate. The Southern California Conference on Technology, Employment and Community will give technological experts, scholars, business and labor leaders a chance to engage in constructive conversation with the citizens of Los Angeles--the students, working people, the mothers, fathers, and children of Los Angeles who are dealing daily with the mushrooming problems and possibilities of the new technology.

SCHEDULE: On Thursday evening, November 21, 7-8:30 p.m., a short program with brief remarks by key individuals in the Glendale Room of Cal State L.A.'s University-Student Union, kicks off the conference. This program will be followed by a reception.

Beginning at 9 a.m. on Friday, November 22 (registration starts at 8 a.m.), conference planners have scheduled four plenary sessions featuring panels of technology experts, community spokespersons, academics, and policy-makers. These starter sessions are designed to stimulate discussion in the workshops that follow. The plenary sessions will cover the following major conference themes: THE PROMISE--Great things made possible by the information revolution; THE PROBLEMS--headaches, nightmares and contradictions of cyber-tech; THE POSSIBILITIES--strategies to deliver the promise; and MOVING AHEAD--overview, outcomes and alliances.

Plenary speakers will include nationally syndicated columnist Gary Chapman; Mike Davis, author of City of Quartz; Gary Phillips, community organizer and author; Jonathan King, biochemist, MIT; Jean Gipe, director, Apparel Technology & Research Center, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona; cyberspace graffiti artist "Mare 139"; David Arian, past international president, Longshoremen's Union; John Hwang, general manager, City of Los Angeles Information Technology Agency; author Abdul Alkalimat and others.

In addition to the plenary sessions, The Southern California Conference on Technology, Employment and Community will offer numerous break-out workshops to provide a forum for public discussion on subjects including: Science Education for the 21st Century; Computer Access for the Underserved; The Social Impact of Biotechnology; Youth and the Impact of Technology; Immigration, Mexican-American Communities, and the Downsizing of Los Angeles Industry; Virtual Heartbeats: the Effects of the Information Revolution on Family/Free time/Quality of Life; The Tech Revolution and Hip-hop Culture; Privacy and the Net: Who is Watching You?; Homelessness and Welfare: Survival in an Era of Corporate Downsizing and many others. Workshops will offer panel discussions with ample opportunities for audience interaction.

Finally, The Southern California Conference on Technology, Employment and Community will offer hands-on computer labs to provide newcomers to the Information Age with an opportunity to manipulate software, browse the Web and see how they, too, can take advantage of world-wide information access.

The Conference has established a web site and encourages all people interested in the subject or the conference to visit: </sites/default/files/techconf/home.htm>._ For further information, call David Sandoval, Cal State L.A.,_(323) 343-3200 or Clyde Flowers (message), (323) 343-2941, or_e-mail <techemp@calstatela.edu> or <clydeflowers@delphi.com>._


Calendar Listing

WHAT: The Southern California Conference on Technology, Employment and Community

WHEN: Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, November 21, 22, and 23

WHERE: California State University, Los Angeles, University-Student Union

INFO: Impact of Technology on Society Project
c/o Department of Economics and Statistics
California State University, Los Angeles
Los Angeles, CA 90032
Clyde Flowers (323) 343-2941 (message), <clydeflowers@delphi.com>
or David Sandoval (323) 343-3200

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