Research

 
 

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AuthorTitleJournalAbstract

Prabhu, V. P., McGuire, S. J., Kwong, K. K., Tang, R. L., Shen, M., & Ilyinsky, A

Social Entrepreneurship among Millennials: Evidence from a Multi-country Study

ISPIM Innovation Symposium. The International Society for Professional Innovation Management (ISPIM)

Social entrepreneurship (SE) is an emerging field at the cross roads of government, non-profit and entrepreneurship. Few studies have focused specifically on millennials and hardly any, which provide a comparative study across countries. The present study provides insights not only into the four factors (deferred gratification, political skills, reputation and attitude towards government) affecting millennials with data from four different countries- China, Philippines, Russia and U.S.A but also the mechanism by which social entrepreneurial self efficacy (SES), culture and life satisfaction affect this relationship. Results provided strong support for negative attitude towards government as a robust predictor of SE across all four countries. Although we found support for the meditational framework of SES, our results did not support the moderating role of culture and life satisfaction. The results, implications and ideas for future research are discussed in detail both from an academic and a practitioner's perspective.

Prabhu, V.,McGuire, S.J.J.,Kwong, K., Zhang, Y. & Ilinsky, A

Social Entrepreneurship among Millennials:  A Three Country Comparative Study

Australian Academy of Accounting and Finance Review (AAAFR)

Anecdotally, members of the millennial generation are in many ways different than members of preceding generations. Millennials are said to be more interested in social issues and also more entrepreneurial than Gen Xers or Boomers. Our study examined the extent to which millennials embraced social entrepreneurship with data from 1114 students from China, Russia, and the USA. We found that perseverance (PER) (in all three countries) and proactive personality (PP) (in China and USA) predicted social entrepreneurial intent (SEI).

McGuire, S., E. Drost & Y. Zhang

Convergent and Discriminant Validity of a Model of Entrepreneurial Culture

The XXVII ISPIM Innovation Conference 2016

The purpose of the study was to examine the validity of a measure of entrepreneurial organizational culture (EOC).Data were collected from 1,941 organizations. First, we examined the EOC model using confirmatory factor analysis both at the individual-level, and for: for-profit companies, non-profit organizations, and governmental agencies, and at the multiple-group level of analysis. We then examined convergent and discriminant validity.

Drost, E. & S. McGuire

Entrepreneurial Organizational Culture as a Predictor of Entrepreneurial Outcomes

The XXVI ISPIM Conference – Shaping the Frontiers of Innovation Management

The purpose of the study was to examine the validity of a measure of entrepreneurial organizational culture (EOC). Data were collected from 1,941 organizations. First, we examined the EOC model using confirmatory factor analysis both at the individual-level, and for: for-profit companies, non-profit organizations, and governmental agencies, and at the multiple-group level of analysis. We then examined convergent and discriminant validity. Results indicate that a revised, more parsimonious model with 6 factors and 25 items was a good fit with the data (GFI =0.939, RMSEA =0.053). Evidence of convergent validity was found by a positive, significant relationship between EOC and “intrapreneurship” (R2 = 0.383, p <0.001). Evidence of discriminant validity was found by a negative association between EOC and security-oriented norms (R2 = 0.107, p <0.001) as well as significant differences between EOC means between for-profit companies and governmental organizations, overall and for each one of its six factors.

R. Duncan M. Pelly

A bureaucrat’s journey from technocrat to entrepreneur through the creation of adhocracies.

Journal of Management Inquiry

How we understand entrepreneurship is a function of the stories we tell. This article uses insights from process theory to explore the ways in which an entrepreneur can employ a story to mobilize others to shed conflicting viewpoints to converge with the abstract. In this story, regulation as a reification of past procedures did not fully account for organizational realities of mailroom inspections conducted by the military post office, so an appeal to foundational values was adopted to alter the shared vision of future potentiality and overcome bureaucratic barriers through the creation of adhocracies.

Veena P. Prabhu, Stephen J. McGuire, Ellen A. Drost, Kern K. Kwong

Proactive personality and entrepreneurial intent : Is entrepreneurial self‐efficacy a mediator or moderator

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & ResearchThe purpose of the present study, which is part of a larger cross‐cultural study, is to examine two potential antecedents of entrepreneurial intent (EI): proactive personality (PP) and entrepreneurial self‐efficacy (ESE). Specifically, the study is interested in empirically testing the mechanism (mediation/moderation) by which ESE affected the relationship between PP/EI. For testing the mediation and moderation hypotheses the study used structural equation modeling and moderated regression analyses respectively.

Leslie K. Williams Stephen J. McGuire

Economic creativity and innovation implementation: the entrepreneurial drivers of growth? Evidence from 63 countries

Small Business Economics

This paper examines the effect of culture on national innovation and prosperity. Because culture shapes the way people think about and behave in regard to risk, opportunities, and rewards, it should influence the nature of entrepreneurial activity and, by extension, economic outcomes. Using structural equation modeling on a sample of 63 countries, we propose and test a comprehensive explanation of how culture as an umbrella construct (as opposed to an analysis of its constituent parts) affects innovation and national prosperity. We propose a two-stage model of innovation, and find support for our hypothesized relationship that “economic creativity” influences “innovation implementation