Abstract#1


                   CONCORDANCE BETWEEN OBJECTIVE AND SELF-REPORT INDICES OF DRUG USE:
THE ROLE OF PERSONALITY AND PSYCHOPATHOLOGY

 

Rosales, A. , Durvasula, R.S., Watford, T., Uchishiba, H., Gonzalez, C., Myers, H., & Castellon, S.

The present study examines whether accuracy of self-reported drug use varies as a function of major psychopathology. Substance use in a sample of 78 HIV positive current drug users enrolled in a larger study of psychopathology and health behaviors was assessed using both a self-report of recent drug use and urine toxicology. The sample was divided into 2 groups of current drug users on the basis of accuracy of self-report: (a) accurate-reporters (N = 46) and (b) inaccurate-reporters (N = 32). A series of chi-square analyses compared accuracy of reporting and Axis I diagnosis (as assessed with the SCID-I), or PD (assessed using the SCID-II and dichotomized Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III scores). No association was observed when comparing Axis I or Axis II disorders and accuracy of reporting. However, when using the MCMI-III as an index of PD symptomatology, significantly greater rates of inaccurate responding were observed in those with BR>75 on the Passive-Aggressive (p=.009) and Schizoid (p=.038) personality scales. These results suggest that sole reliance on self-report of substance use in samples with psychiatric illness, particularly disordered personality may yield unreliable results, and that the use of adjunctive objective indices in such populations is needed.

           

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