Writing Notes

Writing Notes


                                Technical Reports in General

                                            guidelines

                                            examples

                                The NSF Report

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TECHNICAL REPORT WRITING

Structure

            Title      Centered Less than 10 words

            Contributors, dept, univ, univ address

Format

            2 or 1 column

Abstract

            Brief summary of the problem and the solution

Keywords

Intro

            Background

                        Importance of the problem

                        How others solved it

                        More specific than abstract

            Body

                        My solution

            Numerical results

                        Graphs

                        Tables

                        Pictures

            Conclusion

                        Summary of discoveries

                        Future Work

            References

 

NSF REPORT

Session 1 Technical writing tips

Concrete words

Use simple words

Avoid sexist words

Clear writing

Choose appropriate words

Keep sentences short

Use active voice

DonÂ’t hide your verbs

Objective – third person writing avoid personal or first person

Use parallel construction especially in lists

            Use lists sparingly

            Realize they highlight points

            Punctuate consistently

Avoid compound tenses

Avoid tense changes

Analyzing paragraphs

            Topic sentences

                        Main point

                        Placeholder

                        List

            Consistent style

Format Headings or Footers

                        Name page number required

                        Topic/Title, date optional

            Text headings

                                                LEVEL 1

Level 2

            Level 3.  nfconfqefnqf

            Commas

Session 3 The politics of project management

 Who supports you in the administration?

Who supports you among your colleagues?

WhoÂ’s support do I need to implement my curriculum innovation?

Resources

What do you have? What do you need? How can you maximize what you have and procure what you still need?

Collaborators

Marketing

Outcomes

Planning

            Sound goal-hypothesis

            Objective stages

            Timeline

            Build equalizer

            Base test AcaDec students

            Purchase copies of labview and headphones

            Have students use labview to analyze music

            Write up for?????

                        National instruments

            Finish NSF report

Current NSF hot buttons

            Computer security

            Bioterrorism

            Learning Centers

Outlines

            Skeletal overview of the doc

            Guaranteeing that all requirements and criteria of the audience are met

Establishing the logic of the approach to the research

            Serving as a project management plan

Presentation Guidelines

Plan

            Understand and describe your audience

                        Knowledge

                        Experience

                        Needs

                        Goals

            Define your purpose

                        Inform, persuade, motivate to action, sell, teach or train

Prepare

            Use a question related to the audience need

            Pay a compliment

            Relate a relevant incident

            Tell a humorous story

            Outline your key points

            Illustrate and support key points with evidece and visuals

                        Statistics

                        Analogies

                        Demonstrations

                        Testimonials

                        Incidents

                        Exhibits

Graphs

            Avoid or minimize 3D

            Use color judiciously

            Use color with alternate lines forms

Visuals should support

PowerPoint should outline

Background should NOT distract

Verb Tenses

Record in the past tense experiments and experimental data

Use the present tense to discuss data within a published report

And when discussing different current theories

Grants

www.nsf.gov/home/

                        NSF

            Hypothesis

            Importance

            Procedures

            Outcomes

fdncenter.org   The Foundation Center

EPA

NASA

DOE

Dept of Educ

Community of Science

Illinois database IRIS

Abstracts

Must stand alone

250 words or less

Offers brief distillations

Summaries

Either executive or conclusive

Involve statements between 50-5000 words

Refer to the experience or experiment

Descriptive Abstracts

Informative Abstracts

Session 2 Report Format

Upon completion of your Ret you are asked to submit a written report that is typed, double-spaced, 12 pt font and the body should be from 3-5 pages. Appendices should be 2-3 pages in length.

Body of the report

Abstract A brief explanation of the research conducted and the curriculum impact planned

II Introduction Importance of the issue. Why is this being studied?  What is the relevance to the real world?

III Project Goals and objectives

            Hypothesis and problem statement What are the expected results

IV

V Instructional resources to be used

            New lessons

            New curriculum

VI Program support Requirements and Budget

            Equipment and materials

VII Student Outcomes Quantitative and Qualitative

What is the expected effect on student understanding?

Appendices

Research ethics- What was done during the summer experience to support this issue?

Value of the RET On a personal level what is the value of the research experience in your growth as an educator?

 

Hypothesis

NSF emphasis on what is going to happen different in your classroom.

RET teachers have two hypotheses

Summer research activity

Learning centers talk about multiple modes of learning

            Psychology

            Math/science Technology

The curriculum innovation I plan to use

Summer Hypothesis Isolating a certain frequency range of the sound spectrum can alter the sound experienced.  In music, multiple instrument frequencies are juxtaposed and difficult to discriminate to the untrained ear. Specialized equalizers can be developed to isolate and present desired frequencies and sounds sampled from a CD. Equalizers will be developed by the participant to isolate single instruments, combine different groups of instruments and modify signal output.

School Hypothesis Brain and learning research by Robert Slywester and Howard Gardener respectively, have clearly demonstrated that different students do not learn in the same way because of epigenetic differences in their learning centers. Academic Decathlon students challenge themselves in ten diverse academic subjects. Two thirds to three quarters of these students do not have musically- trained ears and do not acquire the required knowledge through auditory training alone. Upon completion of this project, Academic Decathlon students using a specialized equalizer will isolate specific instruments and combine specific instruments as they listen to required pieces. This ability to isolate and combine various instruments will improve student performance in recognizing elements of music within musical pieces. Students will be able to identify instruments by the sounds they make, characterize the relationship of sound waves to music and recognize the elements of a musical piece, such as which instruments are playing the melody or harmony at a specific point in a piece.  Students with improved musical ears will perform better on the Academic Decathlon test in music by 60-100 points.

Hypothesis

            The difference between the way things are and the way things ought to be